This Is Why You're Constantly Waking Up In The Middle of the Night

One minute you're fast asleep, enjoying the comfort of your linen bed threads and dreaming of a tropical holiday in the Mediterranean, and the next you're wide awake and struggling to jump back in where you left off. It's not uncommon, with the Sleep Health Foundation finding that around one-third of Australians regularly suffer from inadequate amounts of sleep. Even just one night of poor sleep—let alone multiple—can have a significant impact on your mood, productivity and overall wellbeing, so if you're someone who consistently wakes up in the middle of the night, these are some of the most common reasons why it might be happening and what to do about it. 

Room temperature

You'll get a better night's rest when your body is cool, so keeping your bedroom at a lower temperature will help you to cope with any heat fluctuations throughout the night. One of the most uncomfortable feelings is waking up in a night sweat, so consider leaving your window open or using a fan on hot summer nights. 

Too many drinks

After indulging in a couple of wines, it can be easier to drift off to sleep, but once you're asleep you'll most likely find that your rest will be interrupted. Drinking before bed can mean that you are asleep in stage one for longer, where you are more likely to wake up from environmental factors. You might also find you're waking up more often busting for the bathroom.

Stressful thoughts

Difficulty sleeping is one of the most common side effects of anxiety and depression, as it can be tricky to turn off unwanted thoughts when the world goes quiet. If you're waking up in a fit of anxiety or are regularly unable to fall asleep due to stressful thoughts, it's worth speaking with your GP to tackle the issue head-on. 

Sleep apnea

This is a pesky disorder that slows or stops your breathing when you're asleep and causes oxygen levels to drop in your body. You're then jolted awake to catch your breath, which naturally comes as a bit of a shock to the system after enjoying a peaceful rest beforehand. If you think this might be to blame for your sleep issues, make an appointment with your doctor to discuss the best treatment to get you sleeping well again.

Indigestion

Eating too much food before bed can cause you to feel too full and uncomfortable when you lay your head down on the pillow at night. Save your heavier meals for the day time and consider a light snack if you're feeling ravenous in the lead up to sleep time.

Too much light

Leaving your blinds slightly open can be a good way to wake yourself up with the sunrise and start your day early. For sleep sufferers though, keeping a bedroom as dark as possible is the way to go to ensure you send a signal to your body that it's time for rest. If there are any gaps of light creeping in, take matters into your own hands and invest in a sleep mask to avoid any distractions. 

Electronic distractions

It should go without saying at this point, but mobile phones and electronic devices in the bedroom are a big no-no. Sleep specialists and health professionals the world over recommend swapping our your smartphone for a book an hour before you plan to sleep and use a more traditional alarm clock to wake yourself up. If you're still tempted, unplug the WiFi modem to get in the habit of a restful night time ritual. 

If you are concerned about your health, wellbeing or sleep, your first port of call should be your GP, who will advise a correct treatment plan. 

If you liked this, you'll love the 9 best superfoods for healthy hair

Your Order
$0.00
Your cart is currently empty.
You have successfully added
to your cart!
You might also be interested in...
Regular price
$100.00
Sale price
$100.00
Regular price
$100.00
Sale price
$100.00
Regular price
$100.00
Sale price
$100.00
candle-01

You're eligible for a free candle!

We'd love to send you one of our hand-poured, 55-hours Australian-made candles with your order. Select your preferred scent below, and leave the rest to us.
No Thank You
x