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11 Real Life Locations That Look Like They’re From A Wes Anderson Movie

We could tell you what a Wes Anderson movie looks like with our eyes closed.

Symmetrical, harmoniously coloured – he likes yellows, greens and reds, he was on board with millennial pink before it was cool – and just that perfect amount of retro. It’s the train carriages in The Darjeeling Limited, the nautical themes in The Life Aquatic of Steve Zissou, the hotel in, um, The Grand Budapest Hotel.

If you’re as obsessed as we are with the way Wes Anderson movies look you might want to follow @accidentallywesanderson, an account that rounds up all the places in the world that adhere to that very specific Wes-thetic. These are some of our favourite real life locations that are accidentally completely, totally Wes Anderson.

1. Fjord ASA boat company, Norway

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________________________ Fjord1 ASA | Molde, Norway | c. 1858 • • Fjord1 ASA, formerly called Møre og Romsdal Fylkesbåtar, is a regional Norwegian transportation company, part of the Fjord1 Nordvestlandske group. Headquartered in Molde, the company is Norway’s largest car ferry operator • • While the current organization was established in 1920 by the merger of a number of local boat services, the origins of the ferry service date back to 1858 when the Fylkesbaatane i Sogn og Fjordane (FSF) shipping company started scheduled ferry on December 2nd of that year • • The county itself built two propellor steam ships in 1858 (Framnæs and Fjalir), and with these began the ferry route between Bergen and Sogn og Fjordane. By 1919 the company had 14 steamships and built its last steamship ("Fanaråken") in 1937 • • During the 1950s, '60s and '70s, the company grew along with the general post-WWII expansion and improvement in Norwegian infrastructure. The organization developed into its present form from the late 1960s when the first fast passenger boats were built, and around the same period, car ferries became a top priority. The bulk of the Fylkesbaatane fleet still consists of ferries from the period 1960–1980 • • In 1971, the company opened a fast passenger route from Sogn og Fjordane to Bergen. One of the ships used was the world's first commercial passenger catamaran: M/S Fjordglytt • • During the late 1990s, the company began expanding into other sectors, notably by acquiring a number of local bus companies • • Today, Fjord employs 900 people, and operates 37 ferries on 27 routes, servicing in total 66 destinations in Møre og Romsdal county. The company also has five passenger boats running in four routes. In a typical year, MRF transports about 4.5 million cars and over 10 million passengers • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @danidougss ✍️: @wikipedia • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #Vscotravel #ArchitectureLovers #Travelgram #TravelMore #SymmetricalMonsters #Norway #Fjord1 #VisitNorway #Molde

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The blue and raspberry chairs, the bracketed windows, the seaside vistas… Fjord ASA’s ferries are about as Wes Anderson as they come. Launched in the mid 19th century the business really took off in the 20s, an era that many associate with Wes’ aesthetic. Today, it’s Norway’s largest car ferry operator, transporting more than four million cars – containing more than 10 million people – every year.

2. City of Toronto Archives, Ontario

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_________________________ City of Toronto Archives | Ontario, Canada | c. 1992 • • The City of Toronto Archives is the municipal archives for the City of Toronto located in Ontario Canada. It holds records created by the City of Toronto government and its predecessor municipalities from 1792 to the present day, as well as non-government records created by private groups and individuals • • The present Archives building was opened in 1992. It was designed by the architectural firm of Zeidler Roberts, who also designed the Toronto Eaton Centre, as a state-of-the-art purpose-built archives building incorporating a climate controlled records, a central atrium and exhibition area; a 60-seat theatre and a Research Hall • • The original purpose of the building was to hold the records of the government of Metropolitan Toronto. Since amalgamation in 1998, documents from the other six constituent municipalities have been housed there. Prior to amalgamation, the archives were held in the respective city halls • • The oldest record in the Archives is a map of Toronto Harbour dated 1792, and the newest one is a DVD of the previous month’s Toronto City Council meeting • • There are also over one million photographs of Toronto within its collection, with over 50,000 available to view on its website. The oldest are a set of twenty-five prints of the city taken in 1856-57 by the firm of photographers, Armstrong, Beere and Hime. These are the earliest known photographs of Toronto • • Other important photographic collections are the William James collection, the Alexander Galbraith collection and the F.W. Micklethwaite collection, the Globe and Mail collection (1922–56), as well as over 100,000 photographs taken by city photographers • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @concretelibraries • ✍: @wikipedia • • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #AccidentalWesAnderson #SymmetricalMonsters #Toronto #Canada #CityofTorontoArchives #Ontario

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Wes Anderson = symmetry, and would you look at these perfectly symmetrical shelves? (The cornflower blue, orange and red detailing is pretty Wes, too.) Opened in 1992, these archives were designed by an architectural firm to house all the official records of the city of Toronto in those neat cardboard boxes.

3. Bar Luce, Milan

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_________________________ Bar Luce | Milan, Italy | c. 2015 • • Bar Luce is a coffee shop-cocktail bar inside the recently opened Fondazione Prada in Milan, a multidisciplinary arts space and showcase for the fashion house • • While the Fondazione was transformed from its roots as a former distillery dating back to the 1910s by Dutch industrial architect Rem Koolhaasis, it’s predominantly grey and minimal characteristics are in stark contrast to the mix of baby pink and pastel green found inside Bar Luce – exuding a 1950s feel, and recreating the atmosphere of a typical Milanese cafè • • Designed by Wes Anderson himself, while his movies often favor symmetrical tableaux, he feels that “there is no ideal angle for this space. It is for real life, and ought to have numerous good spots for eating, drinking, talking, reading, etc. While I do think it would make a pretty good movie set, I think it would be an even better place to write a movie. I tried to make it a bar I would want to spend my own non-fictional afternoons in” • • Some architectural and decorative details from the original structure have been preserved, such as the arched ceiling, which recreates a ‘miniature’ version of the vaulted glass roof of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele, one of Milan’s symbolic buildings. Other key elements of the Galleria are replicated inside, creating a sort of patterned decoration for the top half of the bar • • The bar can be accessed directly from Via Orobia and is meant to be a hotspot for the general public, as well as a regular neighborhood hangout • • 📝***While Bar Luce is far from accidental, I felt it was fitting considering the historical background of the location, the fact that this is the only place in the world designed by Wes Anderson himself, and that this is one of the three places on Prada’s scavenger hunt for their Menswear Show today, so if you are in Milan, now you know where to go 🤗 • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📷: @Prada • ✍: @Fondazioneprada • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Pradacoordinates #Vsco #AccidentalWesAnderson #Italy #Pradass19 #SymmetricalMonsters #Milan #BarLuce #FondazionePrada

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If you think this picture looks like it came straight out of a Wes Anderson movie you’re not wrong. Wes himself actually designed Bar Luce, a traditional Milanese coffee shop, alongside the Fondazione Prada in 2015. There are old school pinball machines and jukeboxes in one corner, terrazzo floors throughout, and a counter where you can feast on sweets that look straight out of The Grand Budapest Hotel. A must visit for next time you’re in Milan.

4. Budapest HEV, Budapest

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_________________________ Budapest HÉV | Budapest, Hungary | c. 1887 • • BHÉV (Budapesti Helyiérdekű Vasút, "Budapest Railway of Local Interest") is a system of four commuter and rapid transit rail lines in and around Budapest, Hungary. The Hungarian word "HÉV" was originally intended to be a permanent abbreviation of local railway companies formed after 1880 • • Originating in 1887, these local railways were built in areas avoided by long-distance main lines, but where railway construction could serve local needs. They were constructed by an autonomous, joint-stock company, but operated by other trusted railway companies, mostly by Hungarian State Railways • • Prior to the HEV, horse-drawn tramways were used, starting operation in 1866. While people of wealth used to ride with their own personal carriages, others rode the predecessors of modern-day taxis, the horsebus – aka the public carriage • • Those who lived on the outskirts of the city used the rudimentary public transportation mostly for recreational purposes, however, it all changed with the arrival of industrialization, when more jobs were created in the city; for example, Újpest was founded in 1840, and the workers, craftsmen, and traders who settled there all worked in Pest • • The railway system now connects Csepel (south), Ráckeve (far south), Gödöllő (northeast), and Szentendre (north) with various points of central Budapest • • Currently operating separately from the Budapest Metro on standard gauge electrified track (1,435 mm), most of its stations are above ground and outdoor, with some are underground. Plans are in place to merge the HEV and Metro lines for more seamless passenger usage via an underground line between the Kaszásdűlő and Lágymányosi bridge station • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @csizikbalazs • ✍️: @wikipedia + @welovebudapest • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #HEV #SymmetricalMonsters #Hungary #AccidentalWesAnderson #Budapest #BHEV

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Glossier, eat your heart out. The original millennial pink can be found in these railway cars, built in 1887 to transport Budapest locals through their city and are still running to this very day.

5. Warrender Baths, Edinburgh

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________________________ Warrender Baths | Edinburgh, Scotland | c. 1887 • • Warrender Swim Centre – traditionally known as Warrender Baths – is a swimming pool and fitness complex in Marchmont, Edinburgh, Scotland. It is notable for its Victorian architecture with bright interior and its old-fashioned poolside changing facilities • • In 1886, Edinburgh residents and members of the Bellahouston Private Baths Club in Glasgow, decided to build a swimming club in Edinburgh. Frank Y. Henderson formed the Warrender Private Baths Club Limited which purchased land from Sir George Warrender, 6th Baronet, and, using the local architect Robert Paterson, built the Baths for an original cost of £11,000 • • The baths were opened in December 1887 and differed from many similar facilities in Edinburgh in that they were originally built privately with the emphasis on fitness and leisure. Many of the city's comparable swimming pools were part of a much wider plans to promote cleanliness and hygiene amongst the working classes, who did not have routine access at the time to sanitation • • Initially the facilities were a success, but by 1906 were no longer viable and closed. The baths were purchased by the city for £3000, where they joined the city's portfolio of similar pools. Periodically suffering further closure threats, they were refurbished in 2005 • • The baths are home to the Warrender Baths Club which is said to be the oldest, most famous and most successful swimming club in Scotland. Numerous Olympic medalists have swam and trained with this club, including David Wilkie, Ellen King and Keri-Anne Payne • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @sooukdotcom • ✍️: @wikipedia + @visitscotland • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #TravelMore #Igersscotland #SymmetricalMonsters #Edinburgh #Scotland #Wanderlust #Visitscotland #WarrenderBaths #Marchmont

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This Scottish pool, originally built in 1886, retains its original Victorian architecture and traditional facilities, and is one of the most beautiful indoor pools in the world. A white, beamed roof and pale blue walls, coupled with the tiled pool, make for an open, light-filled space.

6. Palazzo della Gherardesca, Florence

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_________________________ Palazzo della Gherardesca | Florence, Italy | c. 1473 • • Palazzo della Gherardesca is located in Florence, Italy and was built between 1473 and 1480 for Bartolomeo Scala – the Chancellor of the Republic, scholar, and diplomatic confidant of Lorenzo the Magnificent • • The building was one of the prototypes of the so-called "casini di delizie", which were town houses similar to villas immersed in large parks and gardens, which became fashionable in the eighteenth century • • There is a list from 1901 by the Directorate General of Antiquities and Fine Arts, on which the Palace is noted as a monumental building to be considered a national artistic heritage • • Over the centuries, the estate was utilized as the Suor Maria Riparatrice convent and later home to Cardinal Alessandro de’ Medici, who reigned as Pope Leo XI for a mere month in 1605 before he died suddenly, earning him the nickname Papa Lampo (“The Lightning Pope”) • • Through half a millennium, many additions and improvements were made to the estate, but the courtyard remains in its most original state. Overlooking the "Chapel of the cardinal" it is decorated with frescoes by Giovanni Balducci and today, covered by a nineteenth-century skylight, the work of Piero Sanpaolesi • • The building underwent it’s last and most radical restoration over the course of seven years as architects, historians and craftsmen prepared the Florentine palace to open as a Four Seasons hotel in June 2008 • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @richardwaitephotography • ✍️: @wikipedia • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #SymmetricalMonsters #AccidentalWesAnderson #FourSeasons #Italy #Florence #PalazzodellaGherardesca

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Hailing back to the 15th century, this Palazzo is now a Four Seasons hotel, which means you can rent this very room and rest your head upon this very bed. The detailing in each suite is exquisite, featuring muted colours, velvet finishing and creative artwork.

7. City Hall, Aarhus

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#AccidentalWesAnderson City Hall | Aarhus, Denmark | c. 1941 • • The decision to build a new City Hall in Aarhus, Denmark was taken during a city hall meeting in 1937 and the new building was inaugurated 2 June 1941 • • Designed by architects Arne Jacobsen and Erik Møller, the first proposal did not include a tower but due to massive public pressure it was later added to the drawings along with the idea to clad the structure in marble • • Hans Wegner was in charge of the furnishing – which is uniquely designed to fit the building, and parts of the interior design • • Aarhus has officially had two former city halls prior to this one being built. The first was erected in the middle of the 15th century and was situated in front of the tower of the Aarhus Cathedral. It was demolished in 1859 • • The second city hall was erected during 1856 and 1857, immediately northeast of the Cathedral. Officially it was city hall, courthouseand penitentiary • • From 1856 to 1906, the county councils also held their meetings in the building and the Aarhus art museum, that now has evolved to become the ARoS art museum, started out in the attic in 1859 • • When the building was no longer needed as a city hall due to the erection of the present city hall, it was used as a police station until 1984. Today it houses Kvindemuseet, a museum for women's culture and history in Denmark • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @ofeneck • ✍️: @wikipedia • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #Aarhus #SymmetricalMonsters #Denmark

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This room is almost too pretty to be a city hall, don’t you think? But that’s exactly what this is, a municipal building designed by Danish architects Arne Jacobsen and Erik Molle and interior designed by Hans Wegner in the late ‘30s before opening to the public in 1941. We’re particularly big fans of the floral stenciling on the walls and those cosy, hygge-esque rugs.

8. Vaucluse Yacht Club, Sydney

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_________________________ Vaucluse Yacht Club | Sydney, Australia | c. 1936 • • The Vaucluse Yacht Club is located in the harbor side suburb Watsons Bay in Sydney, Australia and was the first club to race the VJ and VS sailing vessels • • In 1930, at the suggestion of Sil Rohu, Sydney's leading Gun Smith, Charles Sparrow, a Naval Draftsmen, designed the first VJ (Vaucluse Junior) a sailing vessel designed for two boys under the age of 17 • • Shortly after, the Vaucluse Amateur Sailing Association (V.A.S.A.) was established. Members built the VJ prototype "Splinter", and the first working vessel was launched in August 1931 • • Based on demand for a father-son boat, Charles Sparrow designed the VS (Vaucluse Senior) in 1936 which was 3.5 ft longer than the VJ and could hold a crew of three aged 18+. V.A.S.A. housed member's VJs and VSs in "McKlellans" boat shed at the south end of Kutti Beach • • V.A.S.A. soon out grew McKlellans, and the "Vaucluse Amateur Sailing Association (Vaucluse Branch)" was opened in October 1939 to house the existing fleet in Marine Parade by Eric Harrison – the Postmaster General at the time • • Construction of the Club was substantially funded by Norman Knock, of Knock & Kirby fame, a hardware store formerly located in Sydney, and the present name "Vaucluse Yacht Club" was adopted soon after • • By 1940, a fleet of 44 vessels were racing out of the club, with an active membership in excess of 100. Shortly after World War II, one hundred VSs were built in Sydney and shipped to Japan for use by the Australian Occupation Forces • • Due to the changing lifestyle of the average Sydney sider and advancing technology, the Vaucluse Yacht Club introduced several other vessel classes, however the VJ retained its popularity as an active racing class of the club for the next 40 years, until 1972. Currently the Club races Lasers and Yachts • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @herethereandhome • ✍️: @vaucluseyachtclub • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #WatsonsBay #SymmetricalMonsters #Sydney

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Any Sydney-siders reading this? You’ll probably be familiar with the Vaucluse Yacht Club, a small boat house in Watson’s Bay. With its red, white and blue colour scheme and – you guessed it – symmetrical design, we can see why it might appeal to any students of Wes Anderson’s aesthetic.

9. St. Vincent Pilgrimage Church, Austria

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_________________________ St. Vincent Pilgrimage Church | Heiligenblut am Großglockner, Austria | c. 1491 • • The St. Vincent Pilgrimage Church is located in Heiligenblut am Großglockner, a municipality within the Central Eastern Alps. Situated at the foot of the Grossglockner, the highest mountain in the country, it is one of the most renowned and architecturally fascinating churches in Austria • • According to legend – which is visually narrated in a series of paintings inside the church – a flask of the Holy Blood, which is today kept in a sacrament house, was brought here in 914 AD from the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople by a Danish knight called Briccius, who once served Emperor Constantine VII • • On his way home across the Alps, Briccius was buried by an avalanche and in the face of death hid the relic in an open wound at his calf. His corpse was later found by local peasants at a place where three ears of wheat broke through the snow—as rendered in the Heiligenblut coat of arms • • The parish church is dedicated to St. Vincent of Saragossa with earliest records of the church dating back to 1253, while the first pilgrimage to the ‘Heiligen Bluet’ (the holy blood) was documented in 1273 • • In 1390, the decision to turn the relatively small church into a more befitting House of God marked the beginning of an almost 100-year-long construction period. On November 1st 1491, the new pilgrimage church of was consecrated – and has been able to accommodate the continuously growing number of pilgrims and visitors ever since • • The church houses a late-Gothic high winged altarpiece that dates back to 1520 along with the crypt and tombstone of St. Briccius, and the “Iron Book” containing the names of those who have perished on the Grossglockner • • Continuing with the tradition, every June the Pinzgau Pilgrimage draws hundreds of worshippers to Heilgenblut with an event marked by a mass at St. Vincent Church • • Know more? Please comment below! • • 📸: @pangea • ✍️: @Wikipedia + www.heiligenblut.at • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #Austria #SymmetricalMonsters #AccidentalWesAnderson #HeiligenblutamGroßglockner #AccidentallyWA

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Nothing says Wes Anderson quite like a church perched on a mountainside. It’s the kind of thing that wouldn’t look out of place in The Grand Budapest Hotel. This one dates back, incredibly, to 1253, although the version you can visit today was consecrated in 1491.

Worshippers make the journey to the tiny little building, nestled at the foot of Australia’s biggest mountain the Grossglockner, because of a legend that a flask of Christ’s Holy Blood is kept inside the church’s sacristy.

10. Dar Bayram, Tunis

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________________________ Dar Bayram | Tunis, Tunisia | c. 1770s • • Dar Bayram is an old palace located in the Andalusians Street, in the medina of Tunis. It is indexed as one of the largest historical residences of Tunis, in the inventory of Jacques Revault, member of the Middle East and Mediterranean Studies Research Group • • Built in the late 18th century, the home was purchased by Sheikh Al Islam M'hammed Bayram from the Daoud family which was made up of rich notaries and merchants. In 1883, the family began to implement important modifications to the structure, including the addition of an additional floor • • The majority of decorations that were added were in the Italian style: clear marble ground, walls with Italian faience and a wrought iron grill. Sheikh Bayram passed away in the late 19th century prior to the completion of the structural updates, and his sons took up residence in the palace moving forward • • The palace has what is known as a ‘Driba**’ – a large hall with a vaulted ceiling where visitors were greeted and seated – and a 'skifa', a corridor to protect the privatcy of the house ending in the main courtyard which acts as the core of the house. This is in a similar style to many other residences in Tunis, with many apartments or bedrooms surrounding the main courtyard and with two other smaller courts for the kitchen and servants accommodation • • In January 2015, after an almost 10 year restoration process, the palace was reopened as a 5-star hotel named Palais Bayram. The structure was restored with the philosophy to preserve the original architectural elements through traditional building methods when possible • • Know more? Please comment below! • 📷: @yellowillow ✍: @palais_bayram + @wikipedia **@hend_dridi (💛) • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #AccidentalWesAnderson #TravelMore #Wanderlust #iseefaces #SymmetricalMonsters #Tunis #Tunisia #DarBayram #PalaisBayram

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Doesn’t this yellow door look like it came straight from Moonrise Kingdom or The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou? Its sunny, lemon-bright colour is a perfect approximation of Wes’ aesthetic. The door is part of an ancient palace in the Tunis medina build in the 18th century. Today it’s a five star hotel servicing the luxury travel industry.

11. Elmwood Country Club, Iowa

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_________________________ Elmwood Country Club | Marshalltown, Iowa | c. 1921 • • The Elmwood Country Club is a private club and golf course located in Marshalltown – a city in central Iowa in the United States. The club been a tradition of the city since the 1896 when the original “Marshalltown Country Club” was founded • • At the time it was founded, the club was located east of town on 64-acres adjacent to the Iowa River. The original club had a nine-hole golf course, tennis courts, coquet courts, and a clubhouse that was built at a cost of $2150 • • In 1919, an 80-acre tract of timbered land was purchased at the present site of the club. The original owner, Mrs. Sandoe, agreed to sell the land for $250 an acre – including a contribution of the 2½ acres where her log cabin stood (just above the ninth green) under one condition • • Mrs. Sandoe had become accustomed to calling the area “Elmwood”, and if the club would adopt that name, she would agree to provide them with the full extent of the land. The parties agreed, and the "Elmwood Country Club" came into being • • In June 1919 the golf course was completed, and the clubhouse finished two months later. Seventeen ‘Life Memberships' were sold at $500 each during the first year, and by 1921 when the golf course opened, another 74 had been sold • • Today the 18-hole course at the Elmwood Country Club facility features 5,758 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 70. Other activities such as swimming, tennis, and dining are also available to members • • On July 19, 2018 a tornado devastated Marshalltown. While the Country Club was untouched, many homes and businesses in the community were destroyed. The city is in the process of rebuilding • • Know more? Please comment below! • 📷: @tobyhuss ✍: elmwoodcc.com + @wikipedia • #AccidentallyWesAnderson #WesAnderson #VscoArchitecture #Vsco #AccidentalWesAnderson #travelmore #Wanderlust #SymmetricalMonsters #ElmwoodCountryClub #Iowa #Marshalltown #MarshalltownStrong

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When is Wes Anderson going to make a golf movie? The sport seems designed perfectly to slot into a Wes Anderson movie seamlessly. (Don’t you think Margot Tenembaum would have looked fantastic in golf checks and pleated skirts?) If Wes does decide to make his great golfing epic, we bet he’ll shoot here. This country club in Iowa has a look that is entirely Wes’ own.

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Opening image: @mberner via @accidentallywesanderson


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